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Proximal Arterial Occlusion During Treatment of Pelvic High-Flow Arteriovenous Malformations 

Proximal Arterial Occlusion During Treatment of Pelvic High-Flow Arteriovenous Malformations
Chapter:
Proximal Arterial Occlusion During Treatment of Pelvic High-Flow Arteriovenous Malformations
Author(s):

Roshni A. Parikh

, and David M. Williams

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199986071.003.0029
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date: 29 November 2020

Pelvic arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are a cause of significant morbidity. Surgical management of AVMs poses a risk of massive intraoperative hemorrhage, surrounding organ injury, and incomplete removal of the nidus. Unfortunately, treatment is associated with high recurrence rates. Endovascular treatment is the preferred method of treatment; however, the high-flow nature of these lesions poses a challenge, risking nontarget treatment. It is important to provide adequate proximal arterial occlusion before injecting the sclerosant. This chapter outlines the steps involved in creating temporary stasis proximally within an arterial feeder to extend the contact time between the sclerosant and the recipient vessel wall while simultaneously accessing the arterial feeder more distally to deliver the sclerosant.

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