Show Summary Details
Page of

Pioneering Open-Heart Surgery at the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic 

Pioneering Open-Heart Surgery at the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic
Chapter:
Pioneering Open-Heart Surgery at the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic
Author(s):

W. Bruce Fye

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199982356.003.0010
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 06 May 2021

During the early 1950s, several dozen surgeons were attempting to develop technologies and techniques that would allow them to operate inside the heart. The challenge was to develop a safe way to temporarily take over the functions of the heart and lungs so the heart could be opened and drained of blood. A surgeon could then see and repair abnormal or damaged structures inside the organ. The first patients were children or adolescents with congenital heart defects that had caused heart failure. Mayo surgeon John Kirklin led a multidisciplinary team in the testing and clinical use of a heart-lung machine that had been refined in Rochester from plans provided by IBM and John Gibbon Jr. of Philadelphia. Although initial mortality was high, experience with the Mayo-Gibbon machine proved that it was possible to operate inside the hearts and save the lives of patients who were destined to die without surgery.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.