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Human Security, Complexity, and Mental Health System Development 

Human Security, Complexity, and Mental Health System Development
Chapter:
Human Security, Complexity, and Mental Health System Development
Author(s):

Harry Minas

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199920181.003.0008
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date: 17 August 2019

The global mental health movement is committed to the development of mental health services that are evidence-informed, effective, accessible, affordable and equitably distributed, and that protect the human rights of people with mental disorders. The determinants of mental health and illness are multiple and inter-connected. Improving population mental health demands action on multiple fronts by many stakeholders. Effective mental health systems reduce threats and vulnerabilities and strengthen the resilience and capabilities of individuals and communities. The concepts of human security and human development provide a coherent conceptual framework and an ethical foundation for mental health system development. Complexity theory provides the basis for improved understanding of complex adaptive systems and for bringing about desirable change in such systems.

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