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Peripheral Nerve Blocks in Chronic Pain 

Peripheral Nerve Blocks in Chronic Pain
Chapter:
Peripheral Nerve Blocks in Chronic Pain
Author(s):

Paul Singh Tumber

and Philip W. H. Peng

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199908004.003.0037
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date: 22 August 2019

Ultrasound-guided nerve blockade for chronic pain offers advantages over blind landmark-based and fluoroscopic techniques. It allows visualization of soft-tissue structures and spread of the injectate while limiting ionizing radiation exposure. Interventionalists must have both a clear understanding of the anatomy that is being visualized on the ultrasound image and the ability to safely place a needle to the desired target site. Neural blockade of the suprascapular nerve can be useful in the management of chronic shoulder pain such as adhesive capsulitis, frozen shoulder, rotator cuff tear, and glenohumeral arthritis. Intercostal nerve blocks can be helpful for painful conditions that affect the thorax or upper abdomen. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve local anesthetic block may provide analgesia for procedures involving the region, such as skin harvesting. The pudendal nerve block may be useful for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes in certain cases of chronic pelvic pain involving pudendal neuralgia.

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