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Genomic Applications in Audiological Medicine 

Genomic Applications in Audiological Medicine
Chapter:
Genomic Applications in Audiological Medicine
Author(s):

Daphne Karfunkel-Doron

, Zippora Brownstein

, and Karen B. Avraham

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199896028.003.0043
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date: 30 October 2020

Hearing loss (HL) is the most predominant sensorineural disorder, with an estimated genetic etiology of between 60-70% worldwide. Audiological or audiovestibular medicine is the medical specialty concerned with the diagnosis and management of audiovestibular and communication disorders, affecting individuals of all ages. Auditory disorders comprise a broad scope of etiologies that may be inherited, infectious, inflammatory, vascular, traumatic or metabolic. Current genomic tools available to health practitioners today facilitate a practical clinical approach for patients with hereditary HL. This approach will facilitate more precise clinical genetic diagnosis and improved patient care through rapid diagnosis, appropriate genetic counseling and proper medical management for auditory disorders. It is anticipated that genetic testing will become a standard clinical approach following a patient history, physical exam and audiometric profiling for hearing impaired patients.

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