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Human Proteomics 

Human Proteomics
Chapter:
Human Proteomics
Author(s):

Brian Morrissey

, Lisa Staunton

, and Stephen R. Pennington

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199896028.003.0003
Page of

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date: 28 May 2020

As soon as the human genome was sequenced, a new ambitious project was initiated to decipher the human proteome. To date, this goal of mapping and sequencing the human proteome has yet to be realised but remains in active pursuit with the establishment of the Human Proteome Project (HUPO). The mass spectrometry (MS) has been critical to the advances made in proteomics. Where genomics has evolved to be able to map entire genomes, proteomics has lagged behind in part due to the enormous molecular complexity and dynamic nature of the proteome that poses larger analytical challenges than functional genomics or transcriptomics. Despite the hurdles outlined, proteomic technologies have a significant role to play in biological research and the life sciences. As MS capabilities continue to improve and newer approaches are developed the full characterisation of the complete human proteome and more routine analysis of proteomes should come closer to fruition. There remains however significant demand and opportunity for the development of innovative and ground-breaking new technologies – technologies that might operate with an ability to amplify proteins or the analytical signals derived from them and might be able to analyse proteins in a multiplexed manner with appropriate temporal and spatial resolution.

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