Show Summary Details
Page of

Standard Systemic Analgesic Agents: Acetaminophen, Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Opioids 

Standard Systemic Analgesic Agents: Acetaminophen, Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Opioids
Chapter:
Standard Systemic Analgesic Agents: Acetaminophen, Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Opioids
Author(s):

Michele L. Matthews

, and Benjamin S. Kematick

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199768912.003.0010
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 14 April 2021

Chapter 9 addresses drugs used for pain management. These drugs are categorized as standard systemic analgesic agents, including nonopioid and opioid analgesics, and other, neuromodulating, agents that are addressed in subsequent chapters. There is significant variability in individual response to standard systemic analgesics, and choice of therapy should foremost include patient-specific considerations balancing efficacy with tolerability. Acetaminophen is widely recommended for various acute and chronic pain syndromes and is generally considered safe when taken within therapeutic doses. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are versatile analgesics and are commonly utilized for general mild to moderate pain. NSAIDs are the most widely used analgesics today. Opioids are effective for severe pain, such as pain from acute trauma, postsurgical pain, and cancer pain, but require intense monitoring for side effects. All opioids cause sedation, constipation, nausea, and somnolence and can cause respiratory depression, physical dependence, and death. Opioids are available in both short-acting and extended-release or long-acting formulations. Like NSAIDs, opioids should be used at the lowest dose for the shortest duration of time when possible.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.