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We Feel Pain Too: Asserting the Pain Experience of the Quichua People 

We Feel Pain Too: Asserting the Pain Experience of the Quichua People
Chapter:
We Feel Pain Too: Asserting the Pain Experience of the Quichua People
Author(s):

Mario Incayawar

and Sioui Maldonado-Bouchard

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199768875.003.0007
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date: 12 December 2019

It is in part to start to fill this gap in cultural understanding that Dr. Incayawar conducted this first study discussed in the present chapter. He and his team surveyed the Quichua people of the Rumipamba area, southeast of the town of Ibarra, the capital of the Imbabura province in the northern highlands of Ecuador. Their goal was to explore the Quichuas’ pain experiences—more precisely how they perceive, describe, and cope with pain. The Quichuas are demographically the most important Amerindian nation in South America. This unique exploratory description of pain experiences in the Andes should therefore be relevant for the culturally sensitive pain clinician.

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