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Dynamic neuromuscular stabilization and the role of central nervous system control in the pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders 

Dynamic neuromuscular stabilization and the role of central nervous system control in the pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders
Chapter:
Dynamic neuromuscular stabilization and the role of central nervous system control in the pathogenesis of musculoskeletal disorders
Author(s):

Safarova Marcela

, Kobesova Alena

, and Kolar Pavel

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199674107.003.0008
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date: 29 March 2020

Three levels of sensorimotor control within the central nervous system (CNS) can be distinguished. The spinal and brainstem levels control general movements and primitive reflexes during the neonatal stage. The analysis of newborn’s spontaneous general movements and the assessment of primitive reflexes are crucial for screening and early recognition of risk for an abnormal development. Recognizing the very early signs of abnormal development and introducing early functional treatment may help avoid or minimize serious structural and functional consequences. Dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) is a neurophysiological approach that utilizes human ontogenetic models (for example, developmental motor patterns) for both the diagnosis and treatment of dysfunction in the locomotor system in newborns, infants, and adult patients.

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