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The use of TENS for non-painful conditions 

The use of TENS for non-painful conditions
Chapter:
The use of TENS for non-painful conditions
DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199673278.003.0010
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date: 03 April 2020

Peripheral nerves consist of afferent and efferent neurones with different functions. TENS can be used to excite somatic efferents to influence the activity of skeletal muscle, and autonomic efferents to influence the activity of smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and glands. There are physiological rationale to support the use of TENS to manage various non-painful conditions. Clinical experience suggests TENS is often beneficial. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the mechanism of action, clinical use and clinical efficacy for TENS when used to manage non-painful conditions. The chapter covers the effects of TENS on the autonomic nervous system, circulatory system, tissue regeneration, and psychomotor conditions. It also considers the use of TENS for incontinence, constipation, ileus and gastrointestinal discomfort, post-surgical symptoms, and antiemesis.

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