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Sarcomas of soft tissues and bone and gastrointestinal stromal tumour 

Sarcomas of soft tissues and bone and gastrointestinal stromal tumour
Chapter:
Sarcomas of soft tissues and bone and gastrointestinal stromal tumour
Author(s):

Alessandro Gronchi

, Angelo P. Dei Tos

, and Paolo G. Casali

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199656103.003.0055_update_001

Updates

Updated immunophenotypic and molecular characterization of sarcomas.

Updated adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy in localized high risk soft tissue sarcoma.

Updated medical therapy in advanced sarcoma.

New section on gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

Updated references.

Updated on 29 March 2019. The previous version of this content can be found here.
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date: 23 October 2019

Sarcomas are rare tumours that can arise from bone or a variety of soft tissues in a variety of body sites. Surgery is the treatment mainstay for localized disease. Margins of resection are contingent on accurate histologic diagnosis. Adjuvant chemotherapy is routinely employed in osteosarcoma and Ewing Sarcomas, while it is used only on an individualized basis in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma. Isolated lung metastases from either bone or soft tissue sarcoma are primarily treated by surgery, especially if the disease-free interval is long and the number limited. Otherwise chemotherapy is the first-line therapy and subsequent treatments are decided according to response and disease evolution. Treatment planning should include multidisciplinary consultation to determine optimal therapy, taking into consideration tumour histology, site, and extent of the disease, its natural history and sensitivity to available treatments, surgical challenges and, of course, quality of life.

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