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Aetiology and progression of cancer: Role of body fatness, physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle factors 

Aetiology and progression of cancer: Role of body fatness, physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle factors
Chapter:
Aetiology and progression of cancer: Role of body fatness, physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle factors
Author(s):

Fränzel J.B. van Duijnhoven

and Ellen Kampman

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199656103.003.0018_update_001

Updates

Role of body fatness, physical activity, diet and other lifestyle factors on the development of cancer updated according to the latest evidence

Includes new estimates for population attributable fractions of body fatness, physical activity and dietary factors for cancer, in light of new evidence

Updated on 25 May 2017. The previous version of this content can be found here.
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date: 23 October 2019

Worldwide, there is a large difference in cancer rates. These rates may change over generations when people move from one part of the world to another. This occurs because these generations adapt their lifestyle to that of the host country, indicating that lifestyle factors are important in the aetiology of cancer. In this chapter an overview of established associations between body fatness, physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle factors and the development of cancer is given. About one-third of all cancers worldwide are caused by an unhealthy lifestyle. Evidence-based recommendations for the general population to decrease their risk of cancer have been set. Guidelines for individuals who are diagnosed with cancer, however, are lacking, due to limited evidence on the role of lifestyle during and after cancer treatment. Research should now be directed towards the role of body fatness, physical activity, diet, and other lifestyle factors in cancer progression.

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