Show Summary Details
Page of

Anatomy of the asthmatic bronchi 

Anatomy of the asthmatic bronchi
Chapter:
Anatomy of the asthmatic bronchi
Author(s):

Paul O’Byrne

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199651559.003.0039
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 18 November 2019

The quantitative anatomy of the bronchi has been studied in sudden deaths in normal subjects, in deaths from status asthmaticus and chronic bronchitis, and in patients with emphysema. In the normal bronchi the observed range of values for the percentage volume of mucous glands was between 7.6 and 16.7. In the status asthmaticus group the mucous gland volume was greatly increased and in no case was there an overlap with the normal subjects. In the 19 cases of chronic bronchitis, two cases had values of 15.2 and 15.4% respectively, but all the others had values higher than the normal range and, in two instances, values of over 40% were obtained. The values obtained for mucous gland volume in the bronchi in emphysema were variable, approximately half being within the normal range. The bronchial smooth muscle accounted for 4.6 ± 2.2% of the volume of the normal bronchial wall. The values obtained in chronic bronchitis and emphysema did not differ significantly from this but in those dying of status asthmaticus there was a very significant increase with a mean value of 11.9 ± 3.36.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.