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Cooke’s early insights into the potentially curative role of immunotherapy for hay fever 

Cooke’s early insights into the potentially curative role of immunotherapy for hay fever
Chapter:
Cooke’s early insights into the potentially curative role of immunotherapy for hay fever
Author(s):

Anthony J Frew

and Helen E Smith

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199651559.003.0012
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date: 15 October 2019

Hay Fever and Hay Asthma. While the recognition of protein sensitization in the human is undoubtedly an advance, we still have no conception of the reason why or how a certain group of individuals become and remain sensitized while the deliberate inoculation of foreign protein in other persons leaves them eventually, to all intents and purposes, as unresponsive as though they were never sensitized. . . . Treatment [with pollen extracts] A: prophylactic. This is by all means the most satisfactory. Treatment is begun about two months before the anticipated attack. Injections are given subcutaneously at weekly intervals, the dose at first being very minute and gradually increasing at each subsequent injection. During the hay fever season the injections are continued at intervals of from one to two weeks; in all ten or twelve injections are required. B: Phylactic. Cases that present themselves for treatment during the attack are given minute doses on four successive days and then continued at intervals from three to five days. In these cases also from eight to ten injections are required . . . it is not proper to use the word cure, for the cases once rendered immune do not retain a sufficiently high degree of immunity to protect them the ensuing year. It is, however, in general true that the cases satisfactorily immunized one season respond more rapidly to treatment the ensuing year.

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