Show Summary Details
Page of

Therapeutic antibodies Case study I: Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus illness 

Therapeutic antibodies Case study I: Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus illness
Chapter:
Therapeutic antibodies Case study I: Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus illness
Author(s):

Anthony Rees

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199646579.003.0015
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 19 October 2020

In this first case study the history of a viral disease, originating as a primate respiratory infection, and how antibody therapy came to the rescue of human neonates suffering from the same infection, is developed. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was discovered around 60 years ago and affects a large proportion of children within the first few years of their life. After the development of anti-RSV immune donor polyclonal antibody treatment, large reductions in infant mortality were seen. Further major improvements occurred when monoclonal antibodies targeting specific sites on the RS virus became available. The story of the development of therapeutic antibody approaches, enabled by the close interplay of academic and biotechnology company research, is retold in this chapter.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.