Show Summary Details
Page of

Vestibular Physiology: How to be a Clinician and Yet Think Physiologically 

Vestibular Physiology: How to be a Clinician and Yet Think Physiologically
Chapter:
Vestibular Physiology: How to be a Clinician and Yet Think Physiologically
Author(s):

Dominik Straumann

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199608997.003.0002
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 22 January 2021

This chapter discusses a pot pourri of ‘laws’ and facts that neurologists and otorhinolaryngologists with an interest in neuro-otology might wish to be aware of before immersing in a clinical textbook. After all, legions of dizzy patients are waiting to become evaluated and reading time is scarce, especially at the beginning of a neuro-otology fellowship. The choice of topics is motivated by personal experience and the belief that a successful road to neuro-otology is based on phenomenology, in particular eye movements assessment. Only after being able to distinguish normal from disordered ocular motor behavior and after understanding the underlying physiological mechanisms, can one identify the affected neuroanatomical structures and make accurate diagnoses.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.