Show Summary Details
Page of

Fraud and misconduct 

Fraud and misconduct
Chapter:
Fraud and misconduct
DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199608478.003.0025
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 22 September 2020

Fraud and misconduct are firstly introduced by clearly defining the meaning of the two words along with what constitutes good data quality and data integrity. Falsification, Fabrication and Plagiarism are discussed. The concept of how regulators view high quality data is described along with the consequences of falsification. The chapter then goes on to present multiple definitions of fraud and misconduct to show similarities and differences between regulatory authorities in the UK and US as compared to other organisations such as the Royal College of Physicians, the Medical Research Council Policy and UK Research Integrity office. Additionally, five landmark and historical cases are presented to demonstrate what constitutes fraud. The General Medical Counsel's role in protecting public safety by ensuring proper medical standards is described along with the UK Research Integrity Office (UKRIO) and the EU Competent Authority roles in conducting investigations of suspected fraud and misconduct cases. The important roles of whistleblowers are described as well as COPE's role in reviewing published medical journal's research. Practical examples are provided to be used for the detection of fraud as well as specific approaches used by the pharmaceutical industry to detect fraudulent data. In the US, databases are available to conduct searches for individuals who have committed fraud such as the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) and the PHS Administration Action Bulletin Board. Additionally, the process for how fraud and misconduct cases are handled in the UK are discussed along with the options available for regulators, such as the MHRA, on sharing information with the public.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.