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Anaesthesia for adult strabismus surgery 

Anaesthesia for adult strabismus surgery
Chapter:
Anaesthesia for adult strabismus surgery
Author(s):

Shashi Vohra

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199591398.003.0072
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date: 26 May 2020

Introduction 260

Syndromes associated with strabismus 261

History and physical examination 262

General anaesthesia 263

Intraoperative considerations 264

Regional anaesthesia for strabismus surgery 266

Postoperative management 267

Postoperative adjustment of sutures 268

Conclusion 268

Key reading 268

Adult patients present for strabismus surgery for a primary correction, or for revision of previously failed surgery. Strabismus is either congenital or acquired. It is generally caused by paralysis of extra-ocular muscles resulting from damage to the IIIrd, IVth or VIth cranial nerves or it may be due to the inherent weakness of the muscles themselves. Other causes include endocrinal disorders such as dysthyroid disease leading to mechanical restriction, fibrosis, entrapment or overactivity of the extra-ocular muscles. Diabetes causes strabismus via intracranial microvascular pathology. Occasionally patients may present for correction of their visual axis following macular rotation or scleral buckling for retinal detachment. ...

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