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Airway management 

Airway management
Chapter:
Airway management
Author(s):

CA Deegan

and DJ Buggy

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199583386.003.0017
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date: 22 February 2020

Chapter 17 covers airway management, and the first four papers cover the preoperative assessment of the patient’s airway in order to identify clinical signs which would assist the anaesthetist in predicting difficulty with mask ventilation, laryngoscopy, or both. One of these studies describes the best way to elucidate these clinical findings to increase sensitivity and specificity of these tests. Paper 5 highlights the importance of simulation and training in potentially reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, with the author simulating the difficult laryngoscopy scenario with obstetric anaesthesia trainees. Paper 6 was the first description of the use of cricoid pressure to control regurgitation of gastric contents in patients at high risk of aspirating during general anaesthesia. The final four papers describe the use of different airway devices, including the laryngeal mask airway, the intubating laryngeal mask airway, the laryngeal mask airway CTrach, the Glidescope videolaryngoscope, and the Airwayscope, which may be used routinely or in the management of the difficult airway.

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