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Diseases of the Aorta and Trauma to the Aorta and the Heart 

Diseases of the Aorta and Trauma to the Aorta and the Heart
Chapter:
Diseases of the Aorta and Trauma to the Aorta and the Heart
Author(s):

Christoph A. Nienaber

, Ibrahim Akin

, Raimund Erbel

, and Axel Haverich

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199566990.003.031
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date: 22 August 2019

Both chronic and acute diseases of the aorta, including trauma, are attracting increasing attention both in the light of an ageing Western population and with the advent of modern diagnostic modalities and therapeutic options to manage aortic pathology. For aortic aneurysm, an individual rate of expansion and the risk of rupture may be assessed from co-morbidities, hypertensive state, or connective tissue disease, and may be quantified regardless of anatomic location for timely selection and treatment. Acute aortic syndrome, a new term comprising acute dissection, intramural haematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcers, may share common ground by the observation of microapoplexy of the aortic wall, eventually leading to higher wall stress, facilitating progressive dilatation, intramural haemorrhage, dissection, and rupture; chronic hypertension and connective tissue disorders are likely to promote this mechanism as well....

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