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Anaesthesia for paediatric maxillofacial surgery 

Anaesthesia for paediatric maxillofacial surgery
Chapter:
Anaesthesia for paediatric maxillofacial surgery
Author(s):

Ann Black

and Senthil Nadarajan

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199564217.003.0019
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date: 27 February 2020

Probably the most common procedures undertaken by maxillofacial surgeons in children are either explorative dental procedures or soft tissue repair following facial trauma. Another large group of work is related to the primary and secondary management of children with cleft lip and palate. Maxillofacial surgeons work as part of a multidisciplinary team and services are configured in many different ways according to local arrangements. For example, primary cleft work is done in some areas by maxillofacial surgeons and in others exclusively by plastic surgeons. Similarly, craniosynostosis may be managed by maxillofacial, craniofacial, or neurosurgeons depending on local practice and expertise.

Whilst the principles involved in managing an anaesthetic in the older child are similar to adult practice, the expertise of the paediatric anaesthetist and the perioperative care of the paediatric nursing and medical teams are required in managing babies and young children.

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