Show Summary Details
Page of

The Development of Fear and Its Inhibition: Knowledge Gained from Preclinical Models 

The Development of Fear and Its Inhibition: Knowledge Gained from Preclinical Models
Chapter:
The Development of Fear and Its Inhibition: Knowledge Gained from Preclinical Models
Author(s):

Bridget L. Callaghan

and Rick Richardson

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199395125.003.0006
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 10 April 2020

Understanding the mechanisms of fear and stress modulation during development is critical for translation to human disorders of fear, anxiety, and stress regulation. This chapter reviews preclinical research on the development of learned fear and its inhibition through the process of extinction. After describing behavioral differences in learned fear expression and extinction, it discusses developmental differences in the neural circuits mediating fear and extinction, at the structural, neurochemical, and molecular levels. It then presents evidence on the effects of early-life stress on fear and its extinction, at the behavioral and neural levels. This work suggests that the experience of early-life stress speeds up the transition from an infant memory and extinction system (which is characterized by rapid forgetting and relapse-resistant extinction) to the adult memory and extinction system (characterized by long-lasting fear memories and relapse-prone extinction). Potential insights into treating anxiety disorders from the neurodevelopmental approach are highlighted.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.