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On the Cerebellar Processes Resembling Worms and the Tendons That Contain Them 

On the Cerebellar Processes Resembling Worms and the Tendons That Contain Them
Chapter:
On the Cerebellar Processes Resembling Worms and the Tendons That Contain Them
Author(s):

Marco Catani

and Stefano Sandrone

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199383832.003.0022
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date: 18 May 2021

Galen was rather taken by the cerebellum. His dissections of animals led him to believe it was the origin of the motor nerves and spinal cord. And after beginning experiments that compressed the ventricles, he gave particular importance to the vermis, a little stripe of neurons that runs along its midline. Galen incorporated this stripe into the ventricular theory, speculating that it acted as valve to regulate the flow of the animal spirit from the brain down the spinal cord. Despite the advancements made in the last century in the anatomy, physiology and neuroimaging, the cerebellum continues to split the opinion in contemporary neuroscience. The answer as to whether it really does hold some regional specialisation is still up for grabs. All scientists are firmly convinced that the cerebellum plays a role in motor learning and motor coordination, but not all believe it to have a role in cognitive functions and behaviour.

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