Show Summary Details
Page of

Trustworthiness 

Trustworthiness
Chapter:
Trustworthiness
Author(s):

Mark Lazenby

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199364541.003.0002
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 25 November 2020

Trustworthiness, which, according to Onora O’Neill, includes competence, reliability, and honesty, is one of the habits of a good nurse. The profession of nursing ensures the competence of individual nurses. The profession has proven itself reliable through the competent work of individual nurses. Yet because people are in a dependent state when they need nursing care, they call upon individual nurses to be reliable. This has the effect of making individual nurses respond with reliability. Nurses do not deceive their patients, and in this way they are honest. But honesty also includes fairness. Nurses are fair in that they have little stake in profiting from the business of health care; nurses care for people regardless of wealth or social status; and nurses have a concern for the poor and dispossessed. Through trustworthy care, nurses add to the public’s storehouse of trust. This is, in part, the ethical significance of nursing.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.