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The Politics of the Pedagogy: Cripping, Queering and Un-homing Health Humanities 

The Politics of the Pedagogy: Cripping, Queering and Un-homing Health Humanities
Chapter:
The Politics of the Pedagogy: Cripping, Queering and Un-homing Health Humanities
Author(s):

Sayantani DasGupta

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199360192.003.0007
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date: 22 January 2022

Drawing upon progressive pedagogical theorists and her own experiences, the author examines the potential effects and ethical responsibility of the health humanities workshop/classroom. Is it possible to search for oppositional knowledge—as described by Talpade Mohanty—within the health humanities disciplines; what does it mean to crip, queer, or un-home these many fields? In what ways might narrative work pose risks to students when it is practiced without attention to the operation of power and privilege? The author describes the evolution of her own pedagogical approach and proposes three pedagogical pillars to guide socially just narrative practices: narrative humility, structural competency, and engaged pedagogy. By embracing the state of being “un-homed”, the health humanities may strive to become a multiply layered space and time that both affirms difference and provides an alternative to authoritarian power and oppression.

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