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Policy Advocacy for Integrative Pain Management: Getting to Perfect Alignment 

Policy Advocacy for Integrative Pain Management: Getting to Perfect Alignment
Chapter:
Policy Advocacy for Integrative Pain Management: Getting to Perfect Alignment
Author(s):

Robert Twillman

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199315246.003.0004
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date: 26 June 2019

When integrative pain management is optimally practiced, there is a great deal of overlap between clinical practice and ethics. The principles of integrative pain management closely align with the ethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, justice, and especially autonomy, to a much greater extent than is often seen when the biomedical model drives clinical practice. The position of policy, however, is less clear, and the challenge often seems to be bringing policies into alignment with ethics and clinical practice. This chapter discusses how healthcare policies can act to create forces that drive ethics and good clinical practice out of alignment, with one result being that clinicians find themselves practicing in a less ethical manner.

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