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The Clinician as Intervention: Motivational Interviewing and Practitioner Empowerment 

The Clinician as Intervention: Motivational Interviewing and Practitioner Empowerment
Chapter:
The Clinician as Intervention: Motivational Interviewing and Practitioner Empowerment
Author(s):

Robert Rhode

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199315246.003.0013
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date: 30 October 2020

Pain cannot be measured by electrodiagnostic or radiologic means in any clinically meaningful way. As such, pain is assessed first hand by the patient, and second hand by the treating evaluator. The use of pain assessing instruments presents a middle ground between these two perspectives. Their utility is added to by their ability to elicit specific types of information, some of which the patient might not even be aware of, such as whether they employ catastrophic thinking, or experience nociceptive versus neuropathic pain. This chapter is an overview of pain assessment tools which can provide meaningful information about the patient's experience of living within chronic pain.

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