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Management of the inpatient with diabetes mellitus 

Management of the inpatient with diabetes mellitus
Chapter:
Management of the inpatient with diabetes mellitus
Author(s):

Paul G. McNally

and Maggie Sinclair Hammersley

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199235292.003.1482
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date: 18 June 2019

Little attention has focused on aspects of diabetes care and glucose control of patients admitted to hospital. The majority of patients are admitted due to an unrelated general medical or surgical disorder and glucose control is often ignored, with the primary condition taking precedence. Their care is often delegated to nonspecialists and, as a consequence, standards of care vary and length of stay is often longer than age-matched patients without diabetes (1–3). A national survey of inpatient services in the UK in 2005–2006 identified substantial gaps in service provision for inpatient diabetes care; one-third of UK acute hospitals reported that they did not have diabetes management guidelines for day surgery, endoscopy, barium studies, or diabetes-related foot problems (4). Also, in many UK hospitals up to one-third of patients were not routinely managed by the diabetes specialist team and only 50% of acute hospitals in the UK had a diabetes inpatient specialist nurse in post (4).

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