Show Summary Details
Page of

Diabetes mellitus and psychotic disease 

Diabetes mellitus and psychotic disease
Chapter:
Diabetes mellitus and psychotic disease
Author(s):

John W. Newcomer

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199235292.003.1580
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 18 June 2019

In 2006, investigators compiled data from the public mental health systems of eight states in the USA and compared life expectancy for patients with a major mental illness with general population values. Focusing on states with outpatient as well as inpatient data, this study indicated that individuals with a major mental illness have a mean age at death that is 25–30 years earlier than that observed in the general population over the same years in the same states (1). In this study, ‘major mental illness’ included affective disorders such as major depression and bipolar disorder, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorders. Importantly, these data indicated that the leading cause of death in the mentally ill is coronary heart disease (CHD) and when death due to stroke or cerebrovascular disease is included in a category of cardiovascular disease (CVD), they account for more than 35% of deaths in this population. Suicide, by contrast, was responsible for fewer than 5% of deaths overall. Such observations have led to growing clinical interest in the cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors that contribute to the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with psychotic disease, as exemplified by schizophrenia.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.