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Non-invasive breast disease: DCIS, lobular pathologies, and hyperplasias 

Non-invasive breast disease: DCIS, lobular pathologies, and hyperplasias
Chapter:
Non-invasive breast disease: DCIS, lobular pathologies, and hyperplasias
Author(s):

James Harvey

, Sue Down

, Rachel Bright-Thomas

, John Winstanley

, and Hugh Bishop

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199215065.003.0011
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date: 18 October 2019

Non-invasive breast disease: DCIS, lobular pathologies and hyperplasias. This chapter provides an overview of the spectrum of breast diseases which represent a large proportion of cases detected by the breast screening programme. This is a controversial area, as there is debate about potential over-treatment of pre-malignant conditions. The full range of non-invasive conditions is described from diagnosis and prognosis, through treatment, to recommended follow-up. These include atypical ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) and lobular intraepithelial neoplasia (LIN). The contents of this chapter will be of use in discussions with patients, where there is often controversy as to the optimal management and required surveillance for each condition.

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