Show Summary Details
Page of

Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape: A Framework Proposal for the Comprehension and Prevention of Health Professionals’ Complicity in Detainee Abuse 

Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape: A Framework Proposal for the Comprehension and Prevention of Health Professionals’ Complicity in Detainee Abuse
Chapter:
Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape: A Framework Proposal for the Comprehension and Prevention of Health Professionals’ Complicity in Detainee Abuse
Author(s):

Jonathan H. Marks

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199213962.003.0020
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 20 October 2019

Jonathan Marks draws on cognitive and behavioural psychology to provide an account of how health professionals became complicit in the abuse of detainees in the ‘war on terror’. It recognizes that health professionals did not act in isolation, and highlights the role of both macro (social, political, and cultural) and meso (organizational and community) factors that may have contributed to their behaviours. Drawing on the same body of social science research, the chapter also offers some potential measures to address and prevent the complicity of health professionals. These measures include constructing counternarratives, debiasing, acculturating human rights in social and institutional frameworks, developing ethics and policy guidelines, education and mentorship in ethics and human rights, and structural reforms. The role of accountability mechanisms is also discussed, and recommendations made for further qualitative and quantitative research to test and enrich the explanatory account, and to help refine and tailor more effective efforts at prevention and remediation.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.