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Right ventricular outflow tract stenting in the management of tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary artery hypoplasia and major aortopulmonary collaterals 

Right ventricular outflow tract stenting in the management of tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary artery hypoplasia and major aortopulmonary collaterals
Chapter:
Right ventricular outflow tract stenting in the management of tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary artery hypoplasia and major aortopulmonary collaterals
Author(s):

Gemma Penford

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198759447.003.0004
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date: 22 April 2021

Fallot’s tetralogy is the most common cyanotic congenital heart lesion. It is a term that encompasses a spectrum of morphologies, all emerging from the fundamental feature of anterior deviation of the outlet septum and associated abnormalities of pulmonary blood flow. This case follows the journey of a patient with severe Fallot’s tetralogy and multifocal pulmonary blood flow from the neonatal period through to his post-operative period. The case explores key points in the assessment of these patients, addressing the medical, interventional, and surgical options for neonatal cyanosis, and then goes on to discuss common issues and pitfalls surrounding peri-operative care.

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