Show Summary Details
Page of

Mycoplasma infections 

Mycoplasma infections
Chapter:
Mycoplasma infections
DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198729228.003.0092
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 19 November 2019

Head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) are wingless arthropods, which almost exclusively live on the scalp and attach to the hair shafts by means of specialized claws. Humans are the only known host. Head lice infestation in children remains a common problem in the United Kingdom and other European countries, particularly in preschool and primary school children. Commonly reported symptoms and signs include pruritus, erythema, and urticaria. Post-auricular and cervical lymphadenopathy is not uncommon, but complications, including secondary bacterial infections, are relatively rare. Head lice infestation can cause considerable distress to affected children and their families and can have a significant impact on the child’s emotional and psychological well-being. The diagnosis of active head lice infestation is based on the detection of live lice, which is achieved by thorough combing of the entire scalp with a detection comb. In order to break the cycle of re-infestation in the same household, all family members of an index case should be screened, and treated if found to be infested. Treatment options comprise: (i) topical treatment with ‘conventional’ pediculocidal agents (malathion, permethrin, phenothrin, and carbaryl); (ii) topical treatment with ‘novel’ pediculocidal agents (based on dimeticone or isopropyl myristate/cyclomethicone); (iii) treatment with topical or oral ivermectin; and (iv) wet combing. The advantages and disadvantages of each treatment option are discussed in detail in the chapter.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.