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Central venous catheter infections 

Central venous catheter infections
Chapter:
Central venous catheter infections
DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198729228.003.0009
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date: 26 June 2019

This syndrome is characterized by persistent fatigue, often exacerbated by exertion. Other common symptoms include myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, and sleep disturbance. A clear-cut preceding viral infection occurs in around 11% of cases. There are no specific diagnostic tests, but it may be helpful to perform one set of tests to rule out anaemia, and endocrine, renal, or hepatic disorders. The prognosis is ultimately good, with most cases resolving over two to three years. Management should involve a multidisciplinary team with professional supervision of activity levels to establish a baseline and then build activity gradually. Continued school attendance, at least on a part-time basis, and social contact with peers should be strongly encouraged.

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