Show Summary Details
Page of

Chlamydia psittaci infection 

Chlamydia psittaci infection
Chapter:
Chlamydia psittaci infection
DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198729228.003.0055
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 26 June 2019

Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that can be vertically or sexually transmitted. Sexual abuse should be considered when C. trachomatis infection is diagnosed in children beyond infancy who have vaginal, urethral, or rectal chlamydial infection. Vertical transmission may cause neonatal conjunctivitis characterized by conjunctival injection and eye discharge or pneumonia usually characterized by repetitive cough, tachypnoea, and rales. Sexual transmission has a wide spectrum of disease, with 75% of women and many men being asymptomatic, and the main clinical presentations represented by urethritis, cervicitis, endometritis, salpingitis, and proctitis. Chronic diseases are represented by lymphogranuloma venereum and trachoma. Clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by cell culture and nucleic acid amplification tests. Effective treatment includes macrolide, doxycycline, or a quinolone for 7 days. Testing for the presence of C. trachomatis should be done at least annually in sexually active adolescents and young adults and in pregnant women at high risk of C. trachomatis infection (i.e. women aged under 25 years and those with multiple sexual partners). Prophylaxis of infants born to infected mothers is not usually recommended. In areas that are endemic for trachoma, the World Health Organization implements the SAFE approach: surgery, antibiotics, face washing, and environmental improvement. Future research should focus on maternal chlamydial infection, standardized diagnostic tests, efficacy studies in neonates, and identification of a vaccine.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.