Show Summary Details
Page of

Zoonoses 

Zoonoses
Chapter:
Zoonoses
DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198729228.003.0041
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD MEDICINE ONLINE (www.oxfordmedicine.com). © Oxford University Press, 2016. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a title in Oxford Medicine Online for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 22 May 2019

Adenoviruses infect most mammals, birds, and reptiles. Human adenoviruses, initially recognized as a cause of acute respiratory disease in children and young adults, are associated with a wide variety of clinical syndromes, from asymptomatic or mild infection, typical self-limiting respiratory, gastrointestinal, or ophthalmological illnesses, through to rarer, severe, and occasionally fatal disease. Human adenoviruses usually cause localized infections; generalized infection is commoner in immunocompromised patients. Acquisition is via one of several routes: respiratory droplets, ingestion via faecal–oral route, contact (especially hand-to-eye transfer), water (e.g. inadequately chlorinated pools), and venereal. Diagnostic tests are now predominantly by molecular detection methods on a variety of specimens (e.g. respiratory, tissue, urine, blood). Most adenoviral infections in the immunocompetent host are self-limiting and do not warrant specific therapy. Severe adenoviral disease, especially in immunocompromised hosts, drives the search for effective therapies. Prevention is based on infection control measures, and no human adenovirus vaccines have since been developed. Future research will evaluate human adenovirus potential as vectors for vaccination and for gene therapy because they can be genetically altered in vitro without producing infectious, pathogenic viral offspring.

Access to the complete content on Oxford Medicine Online requires a subscription or purchase. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts for each book and chapter without a subscription.

Please subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.