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Collection, transport, and laboratory processing of wound, tissue, and bone samples 

Collection, transport, and laboratory processing of wound, tissue, and bone samples
Chapter:
Collection, transport, and laboratory processing of wound, tissue, and bone samples
Author(s):

Geoff Edwards-Jones

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198716006.003.0003
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date: 02 July 2022

Clinical diagnosis of any infection is usually confirmed in the laboratory by the isolation of the pathogen, detection of a specific gene, toxin, or antigen, or demonstration of the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies or a rise in titre of immunoglobulin G. Subsequent identification of the organism and antimicrobial susceptibilities are provided to help the clinician with treatment and the infection control officer with epidemiological information. Diagnosis of acute wound infection can be relatively straightforward provided sufficient clinical details are given, with usually a single pathogen isolated. Chronic wounds are more problematic because they are frequently heavily colonized with a mixture of organisms and no single causative pathogen can be easily identified. A number of factors can influence the isolation of pathogens from samples and these are discussed in detail in this chapter.

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