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Cardiomyopathies 

Cardiomyopathies
Chapter:
Cardiomyopathies
Author(s):

Patrizio Lancellotti

and Bernard Cosyns

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198713623.003.0008
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date: 01 June 2020

This chapter focuses on the role of echocardiography in dilated cardiomyopathy, showing diagnostic and associated findings along with the prognostic role of echocardiography. Primary myocardial disease is inadequate hypertrophy, independent of loading conditions and often other affected structures such as mitral valve apparatus, small coronary arteries, and cardiac interstitium. Arrhythmogenic RV cardiomyopathy is fatty or fibro-fatty infiltration of the RV with apoptosis and hypertrophied trabeculae of the RV. This chapter also details diagnostic findings and progression of this condition alongside relevant echocardiographic findings. Previously known as ‘spongy heart syndrome’, left ventricular non compaction is characterized by the absence of involution of LV trabeculae during the embryogenic process. This chapter demonstrates the diagnostic findings of this condition, and looks at the diagnostic findings and complications of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, illustrating typical, RV apical and variant views. It also shows diagnostic findings in myocarditis in both the acute phase and follow-up.

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