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Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and decision-making processes for older adults 

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and decision-making processes for older adults
Chapter:
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: outcomes and decision-making processes for older adults
Author(s):

Esther M. M. van de Glind

, Barbara C. van Munster

, and Marije E. Hamaker

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198701590.003.0110
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date: 18 October 2019

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was developed in the 1950s as a treatment for cardiopulmonary arrest. Outcome of CPR remains poor, particularly in older people, as demonstrated by two recent meta-analyses. The first addressed out-of-hospital resuscitation in patients aged 70 years and over, and found pooled overall rates of survival to discharge of 4.1%. For in-hospital resuscitation, the overall pooled rate of survival to discharge was 18.7% for patients aged 70–79 years, 15.4% for patients aged 80–89 years and 11.6% for those aged 90 or over. It is not clear if age alone is a limiting factor, or rather a marker of comorbidity. Overall, information about the quality of life after surviving CPR is lacking. Older patients should be adequately informed about their chances of survival in good condition in order to make a decision about the desirability of CPR.

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