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Psychological theories of suicidal behaviour 

Psychological theories of suicidal behaviour
Chapter:
Psychological theories of suicidal behaviour
Author(s):

M David Rudd

, David RM Trotter

, and Ben Williams

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198570059.003.0025
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date: 15 September 2019

In this chapter a review of the most prominent and influential psychological theories of suicide and suicidal behaviour is presented. Most, if not all, of these theories have had direct and important implications for both the assessment and treatment of suicidality, with cognitive approaches at the forefront over the last decade. Many have been tied to treatment paradigms and programmes, with some emerging directly from therapeutic practice. As has been evidenced elsewhere in this text, the majority of more recent theoretical efforts have revolved around cognitively (and behaviourally) oriented approaches, with natural integration of social and related contextual elements.

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