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New Challenges for Anesthesiologists Outside of the Operating Room: The Cardiac Catheterization and Electrophysiology Laboratories 

New Challenges for Anesthesiologists Outside of the Operating Room: The Cardiac Catheterization and Electrophysiology Laboratories
Chapter:
New Challenges for Anesthesiologists Outside of the Operating Room: The Cardiac Catheterization and Electrophysiology Laboratories
Author(s):

Wendy L. Gross

, Lebron Cooper

, Robert T. Faillace

, Douglas C. Shook

, Suanne M. Daves

, and Robert M. Savage

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780190495756.003.0022
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date: 23 October 2019

Invasive cardiology procedures have changed dramatically over the past 5–10 years. With technological advancement, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures have become broader in scope and complexity, and patient acuity has escalated dramatically. In parallel, the involvement of anesthesiologists has grown. In this chapter, we present an overview of the laboratory environment(s), the evolution and future pathways of current practice(s), cases performed in each venue, and current anesthetic approaches. In this new and changing arena, collaboration and planning between cardiologists and anesthesiologists maximizes patient safety and increases the probability of procedural success. A thorough understanding of the procedure to be performed is required in order for anesthesiologists to define and delineate the extent of their involvement, and is a clear prerequisite for the formulation of a safe and effective anesthetic plan. A common knowledge base and mutual respect for each contributing discipline form the basis for integration of cardiology and anesthesia services in pursuit of optimized patient care.

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