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Somatosensory and Pain Evoked Potentials: Normal Responses, Abnormal Waveforms, and Clinical Applications in Neurological Diseases 

Somatosensory and Pain Evoked Potentials: Normal Responses, Abnormal Waveforms, and Clinical Applications in Neurological Diseases
Chapter:
Somatosensory and Pain Evoked Potentials: Normal Responses, Abnormal Waveforms, and Clinical Applications in Neurological Diseases
Author(s):

François Mauguière

, and Luis Garcia-Larrea

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780190228484.003.0043
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date: 19 October 2019

This chapter discusses the use of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and pain evoked potentials for diagnostic purposes. The generators of SEPs following upper limb stimulation have been identified through intracranial recordings, permitting the analysis of somatosensory disorders caused by neurological diseases. Laser activation of fibers involved in thermal and pain sensation has extended the applications of evoked potentials to neuropathic pain disorders. Knowledge of the effects of motor programming, paired stimulations, and simultaneous stimulation of adjacent somatic territories has broadened SEP use in movement disorders. The recording of high-frequency cortical oscillations evoked by peripheral nerve stimulation gives access to the functioning of SI area neuronal circuitry. SEPs complement electro-neuro-myography in patients with neuropathies and radiculopathies, spinal cord and hemispheric lesions, and coma. Neuroimaging has overtaken SEPs in detecting and localizing central nervous system lesions, but SEPs still permit assessment of somatosensory and pain disorders that remain unexplained by anatomical investigations.

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