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Questions and Answers 

Questions and Answers
Chapter:
Questions and Answers
Author(s):

James R. Hebl

and Robert L. Lennon

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780190214883.003.0072
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date: 01 October 2020

Questions

Multiple Choice (choose the best answer)

III.1. Which of the following antiepileptic medications has the shortest half-life?

  1. a. Perampanel

  2. b. Clobazam

  3. c. Phenobarbital

  4. d. Zonisamide

  5. e. Pregabalin

III.2. You have recently diagnosed intermittent migraine headache without aura in a 25-year-old woman. Her headaches are occurring multiple times each week, and you have discussed starting preventive therapy with topiramate. The patient should be aware of which of the following groups of potential adverse effects?

  1. a. Insomnia, decreased appetite, aplastic anemia, hepatic failure

  2. b. Drowsiness, loss of peripheral vision

  3. c. Cognitive slowing, paresthesias, decreased appetite, nephrolithiasis

  4. d. Weight gain, sedation, tremor, pancreatitis, hepatotoxicity

  5. e. Dizziness, imbalance, prolonged PR interval

III.3. You are seeing a 72-year-old man with slowly progressive asymmetric resting tremor and imbalance. Your diagnosis is idiopathic Parkinson disease. Which of the following medications is least likely to be associated with nausea?

  1. a. Selegiline

  2. b. Apomorphine

  3. c. Levodopa

  4. d. Pramipexole

  5. e. Ropinirole

III.4. A 22-year-old man presents with infrequent intermittent pulsatile headaches associated with nausea and vomiting, often preceded by a transient visual scotoma. You diagnose intermittent migraine with aura. Which of the following abortive medications has the longest half-life?

  1. a. Sumatriptan

  2. b. Naratriptan

  3. c. Zolmitriptan

  4. d. Frovatriptan

  5. e. Rizatriptan

III.5. A 33-year-old woman with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis has continued to experience frequent clinical and radiographic relapses. On further questioning, you learn that she has not been compliant with her current disease-modifying agent because of severe aichmophobia (fear of needles). Which of the following medications would be the most reasonable alternative in this setting?

  1. a. Mitoxantrone

  2. b. Interferon beta-1b

  3. c. Natalizumab

  4. d. Glatiramer acetate

  5. e. Fingolimod

III.6. The family of an 82-year-old woman brings her in for evaluation of slowly progressive cognitive decline. You diagnose likely Alzheimer dementia. Which of the following medications acts primarily as an NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-receptor antagonist?

  1. a. Rivastigmine

  2. b. Memantine

  3. c. Galantamine

  4. d. Tacrine

  5. e. Donepezil

III.7. A 61-year-old woman with long-standing migraine headache without aura presents with increasing headache frequency. She has a history notable for severe depression, nephrolithiasis, and unexplained syncope currently being evaluated by her cardiologist. Which of the following medications would you recommend for headache prevention?

  1. a. Propranolol

  2. b. Verapamil

  3. c. Topiramate

  4. d. Amitriptyline

  5. e. OnabotulinumtoxinA

Answers

III.1. Answer e.

White HS, Rho JM. Mechanisms of action of antiepileptic drugs. Professional Communications: West Islip (NY); c2010.

III.2. Answer c.

White HS, Rho JM. Mechanisms of action of antiepileptic drugs. Professional Communications: West Islip (NY); c2010.

III.3. Answer a.

Minagar A, Benarroch EE, Koller WC. Basic pharmaceutical principles and the blood-brain barrier. In: Noseworthy JH, editor. Neurological therapeutics: principles and practice. 2nd ed. Abingdon (UK): Informa Healthcare and Boca Raton (FL): Taylor & Francis; c2006. p. 3–24.

III.4. Answer d.

Minagar A, Benarroch EE, Koller WC. Basic pharmaceutical principles and the blood-brain barrier. In: Noseworthy JH, editor. Neurological therapeutics: principles and practice. 2nd ed. Abingdon (UK): Informa Healthcare and Boca Raton (FL): Taylor & Francis; c2006. p. 3–24.

III.5. Answer e.

Freedman MS. Present and emerging therapies for multiple sclerosis. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2013 Aug;19(4 Multiple Sclerosis):968–91.

III.6. Answer b.

Minagar A, Benarroch EE, Koller WC. Basic pharmaceutical principles and the blood-brain barrier. In: Noseworthy JH, editor. Neurological therapeutics: principles and practice. 2nd ed. Abingdon (UK): Informa Healthcare and Boca Raton (FL): Taylor & Francis; c2006. p. 3–24.

III.7. Answer e.

Minagar A, Benarroch EE, Koller WC. Basic pharmaceutical principles and the blood-brain barrier. In: Noseworthy JH, editor. Neurological therapeutics: principles and practice. 2nd ed. Abingdon (UK): Informa Healthcare and Boca Raton (FL): Taylor & Francis; c2006. p. 3–24.

Suggested Reading

Freedman MS. Present and emerging therapies for multiple sclerosis. Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2013 Aug;19(4 Multiple Sclerosis):968–91.Find this resource:

Minagar A, Benarroch EE, Koller WC. Basic pharmaceutical principles and the blood-brain barrier. In: Noseworthy JH, editor. Neurological therapeutics: principles and practice. 2nd ed. Abingdon (UK): Informa Healthcare and Boca Raton (FL): Taylor & Francis; c2006. p. 3–24.Find this resource:

White HS, Rho JM. Mechanisms of action of antiepileptic drugs. Professional Communications: West Islip (NY); c2010.Find this resource: