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Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and the effects of deep brain stimulation surgery 

Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and the effects of deep brain stimulation surgery
Chapter:
Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and the effects of deep brain stimulation surgery
Source:
Non-motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease (2 ed.)
Author(s):

Shen-Yang Lim

, Elena Moro

, Ai Huey Tan

, and Anthony E. Lang

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199684243.003.0027

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus dramatically improves motor symptoms, daily functioning and quality of life in well-selected patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Since their introduction into clinical practice in the late 1990s, these procedures have become established, evidence-based treatment options for patients with severe motor response complications. More recently, DBS has also been shown to provide superior outcomes compared with medical therapy alone in relatively early-stage PD. Indeed, after levodopa, DBS is widely considered to be the most important advance in PD therapeutics. However, DBS is a complex therapy and successful treatment depends on the careful selection of appropriate candidates, optimal placement of the stimulating electrodes and post-operative adjustment of stimulation parameters and antiparkinsonian medications.

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