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Neurobiology of sleep: the role of dopamine in Parkinson’s disease-related sleep disorders 

Neurobiology of sleep: the role of dopamine in Parkinson’s disease-related sleep disorders
Chapter:
Neurobiology of sleep: the role of dopamine in Parkinson’s disease-related sleep disorders
Source:
Non-motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease (2 ed.)
Author(s):

Lynn Marie Trotti

and David B. Rye

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199684243.003.0013

Sleep problems are common and troubling for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD): one survey found that 98% of respondents had some PD-related problems during the night or upon awakening, but not all rated their overall sleep quality as poor. Sleep problems in PD are not uniform, and not everything that patients may experience or report as sleepiness is truly an increased propensity to sleep; e.g. a number of patients report fatigue that seems more related to their motor disability than to sleepiness. However, genuine sleepiness is undeniably common in PD and self-reported sleepiness or unintended sleep severe enough to interfere with activities of daily living occurs in 10–75% of PD patients. The sleepiness of PD is likely to be multifactorial, with contributions from both dopamine loss and exogenous dopaminergic medications, as well as other non-dopaminergic dysfunctions. Dopamine loss may also contribute to some forms of excessive nocturnal movement.

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