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Individual placement and support: the evidence-based practice of supported employment. 

Individual placement and support: the evidence-based practice of supported employment.
Chapter:
Individual placement and support: the evidence-based practice of supported employment.
Source:
Oxford Textbook of Community Mental Health
Author(s):

Deborah R. Becker

, Gary R. Bond

, and Robert E. Drake

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199565498.003.0090

In most societies, employment is a major avenue to social inclusion (Grove et al., 2005). The benefits of working include increasing one’s financial resources, being productive and contributing to society, utilizing one’s skills and talents, enhancing self-esteem, improving self-image, meeting other people, and structuring one’s time. People with severe mental illness benefit from employment in these same ways. In addition, work enables many to recover from the disabling effects of mental illness.

Expectations for people with severe mental illness have changed drastically in the last two decades. Clients who once were relegated to day treatment 5 days a week are now working competitively.

The most successful employment practice to assist people develop a working life is a form of supported employment called individual placement and support (IPS). IPS has been standardized, tested, and implemented in several countries, especially the United States.

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