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Epidemiology of infection in elderly populations in various settings 

Epidemiology of infection in elderly populations in various settings
Chapter:
Epidemiology of infection in elderly populations in various settings
Source:
Oxford Textbook of Geriatric Medicine (3 edn)
Author(s):

Gaëtan Gavazzi

, Thibaut Fraisse

, and Benoit de Wazières

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780198701590.003.0080_update_001
Previous versions of this chapter are available. To view earlier versions of this chapter view the full site here.

Age is associated with an increased risk of infection because of individual susceptibility (immunosenescence, comorbidities, malnutrition, functional status), as well as collective risk factors. Outcomes are also of concern, because for all infections, older patients exhibit higher short and long-term mortality rates. Over the last decade, subgroups of older populations (either community-dwelling, hospitalized or nursing home residents) have been distinguished, because epidemiological data regarding infections differ between these groups in terms of incidence, type, severity, and microbiology. Although urinary tract and respiratory tract infections appear to be the most frequent infections in these specific populations, skin/soft tissue and gastrointestinal infections, as well as meningitis are frequent in community-acquired infection (CAI), whereas outbreaks (respiratory and gastrointestinal) are more specific to nursing home infections, and antibiotic resistance is emerging as a major issue for both hospitalized and nursing home elder populations.

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