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Translation and use of interviewing schedules for use in more than one language and culture 

Translation and use of interviewing schedules for use in more than one language and culture
Chapter:
Translation and use of interviewing schedules for use in more than one language and culture
Author(s):

John E. Cooper

and Norman Sartorius

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199669493.003.0009
Page of

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date: 21 November 2017

The idea that the significance of behaviour and language can be assessed only within their own culture has been superceded by the view that with due precautions, realistic comparisons and equivalences can be reached. Attention needs to be paid to equivalence, which takes account of the setting in which behaviour occurs, and authenticity which refers to the ability of the interviewer to get direct and ‘genuine’ answers from the respondent. When translating, the translation needs to be checked for its semantic, conceptual, and technical equivalences. The extent to which these different types of equivalence can be achieved depends to some extent on the properties of the schedule being translated, and the structured semi-standardized types are the best for this. Translation needs to be done by bi-lingual psychiatrists, using the re-iterative back translation method in cooperation with local mono-lingual experts. Video- or tape-recordings can be used for some of these procedures, but face-to-face discussions are likely to be more productive. Some simple rules for the translation processes are given.

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