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Other large community-based diagnostic surveys 

Other large community-based diagnostic surveys
Chapter:
Other large community-based diagnostic surveys
Author(s):

John E. Cooper

and Norman Sartorius

DOI:
10.1093/med/9780199669493.003.0007
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date: 23 November 2017

Several large community-based diagnostic surveys have been carried out in different countries in recent decades, following the ECA studies of the USA. In China, the Chinese National Epidemiological Survey of Mental Disorders was carried out in 1982, using 51,982 subjects in 12 Centres. In the UK in 1995, the Office of Population and Census Surveys conducted a study of Psychiatric Morbidity in four selected groups totalling some 14,000 persons. A collaborative European Study of the Epidemiology of Mental Disorders was completed in 2005, using 21,425 subjects in 6 countries, and the World Mental Health Survey of the WHO using 85, 052 subjects in 17 countries was done in 2005. Most of these surveys used the CIDI interview. The results of these surveys were broadly similar, but detailed comparisons cannot be made because different types of mental health statistics were reported from the different surveys. A striking common finding was that large proportions of persons with mental disorders have never sought care from mental health services. These surveys do not have a direct or immediate effect upon the provision of mental health services. In any community, the need for mental health services, the demands made for such services,the availability of services and the governmental and local policies to provide services have a complicated and not direct relationship.

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